It is already Week 4 of our CSA Baskets!

Down on the Farm Notes

Hope you are all having a great spring. We are having warmer temperatures than usual here in Northern Nevada, and we have been planting melons, tomatoes and summer produce like crazy! This week have packed the following produce for our basket customers.

Organic Ovation Greens

Organic Carrots

Organic Tango Lettuce

Organic Chard

Organic Green Garlic

Organic Turnips

Organic Cilantro

Organic Rhubarb

Organic Thyme (Salisha’s Delicious)

On a small parcel of land Fallon Grower Salisha Odum makes big things happen. The 35-year-old mother of four and longtime gardener started exploring organic growing methods seven years ago. In 2009, Odum produced $20,000 worth of vegetable and herb crops on her farm called Salisha’s Delicious. With a seemingly limitless well of energy, Odum supplies produce to the Great Basin Community Food Co-op, six different CSAs, and even pulls together her own CSA boxes for 15 or so of her neighbors.

“To me there’s no question between whether to go organic or not,” Odum says. “It’s really important for me to give the community another way to buy food.”

Amazingly, with the exception of a 16-year-old son who pitches in when he can, Odum does the lion’s share of the farm work herself. Sure, Odum is proud that she’s earning a modest living from her organic farm. But she’s especially gratified to play a role in educating her community about a healthy, locally sourced diet.

Odum grows a wide variety of greens, as well as plenty of root vegetables, broccoli, eggplants, peppers, tomatoes, and celery. She has four hoop houses, which allow her to keep plants growing through fall and winter.

“I have a passion for digging in the dirt; it’s my higher calling,” she explains. “I’m happy to be able to feed good food to good people.”

For details, 775-427-5167 or whvmkv@phonewave.net.

Article courtesy of Edible Reno-Tahoe magazine

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If you are interested in finding out more about our baskets, please call Ann at 775-351-2551 or email her at:   greatbasinbasketcsa@gmail.com.

 Produce Tips

 What are Ovation Greens?  This organic green mix is a great combination of both mild and spicy ingredients. This mix includes Red Mustard, Mizuna, Tatsoi, Kale, and Arugula. It’s a great mix for braising as well as fresh eating.

Swiss chard is similar to spinach, kale and collard greens. Tall and leafy with a crunchy stalk, chard is slightly salty and a tad bitter, and works well with fish and vegetable dishes. If you are unfamiliar with chard, try substituting it in recipes that call for fresh spinach or other greens. Experiment with different seasonings and you will likely find chard to be a welcome addition to your healthy diet. When choosing Swiss chard look for stalks and leaves that are paler in color, as white chard tends to be the most tender.

Thyme is supplied by Salisha’s Delicious. Thyme is a strong-smelling herb with small grey-green leaves. The varieties used in cooking are common thyme and lemon thyme, which has a mild lemon flavor. Wrap in damp paper towel and store in a sealed plastic bag or airtight container in the fridge for up to one week. Wash, then use whole sprigs in cooking or strip the leaves and chop if desired. Add whole sprigs to casseroles for extra flavor. Remove before serving. Sprinkle thyme leaves and sea salt over potatoes, and then roast.

Turnips are simple to prepare. Remove tops and ends then wash and scrub thoroughly. If they are very young, scrape as for young carrots; when larger, pare thinly. For cooking they may be shredded, sliced thinly, or diced. Small ones may be cooked whole then hollowed to form cups or shells, then stuffed and baked. Cook until just tender, overcooking gives less than tasty results. Add a teaspoonful of sugar to the water to add flavor, this lessens the cooking odor.

Country Kitchen Recipes

Rhubarb Upside Down Cake

2 cups fresh rhubarb, diced

2 tablespoons butter

¾ cup brown sugar

3 eggs

1 ½ cups sugar

1 teaspoon baking powder

½ cup boiling water

Wash and finely dice rhubarb. Set aside. Melt butter in 9×9 inch square pan. Add brown sugar, spread evenly and add rhubarb. Separate whites of eggs. Beat egg yolks until light and slowly add sugar, flour and baking powder. Beat well. Add boiling water. Beat vigorously. Stiffly beat eggs whites and fold into the egg mixture. Pour over rhubarb. Bake at 350 degrees F for 45 minutes. Remove from pan at once.

Braised Turnips

Prep Time:  5 minutes

Cook Time:  1 hour 10 minutes

4 small turnips – peeled, halved lengthwise, and sliced 1/2-inch thick

2 tablespoons butter, cut into small pieces

1 (12 fluid ounce) bottle dark beer, or amount to cover

1 pinch dried savory

salt to taste

Preheat an oven to 350 degrees F. Place the turnips in a pot with enough cold, salted water to cover. Bring the water to a boil and cook until the turnips are soft, about 7 minutes; drain. Transfer the turnips to a shallow baking dish. Dot the top of the turnips with pieces of butter. Pour enough of the beer into the dish to cover the turnips. Season with savory and salt.  Bake in the preheated oven until the beer is mostly cooked off and the turnip is tender, about 1 hour. This is a great side for turkey or pork roast.

Sautéed Swiss Chard with Parmesan Cheese

Prep Time:  15 minutes

Cook Time:  10 minutes

2 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 tablespoon minced garlic

1/2 small red onion, diced

1 bunch Swiss chard, stems and center ribs cut out and chopped together, leaves coarsely chopped separately

1/2 cup dry white wine

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice, or to taste

2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese

salt to taste (optional)

Melt butter and olive oil together in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in the garlic and onion, and cook for 30 seconds until fragrant. Add the chard stems and the white wine. Simmer until the stems begin to soften, about 5 minutes. Stir in the chard leaves, and cook until wilted. Finally, stir in lemon juice and Parmesan cheese; season to taste with salt if needed.

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